Whether you like big yards or hip nightclubs, there’s a community type that fits your lifestyle – here is a look at 12 neighborhood types that will help you decide what is right for you whether you are in Chicago, San Francisco, Dallas or Fort Worth.

1. Urban Core (Downtown) – Condos, apartments and skyscrapers in downtown Dallas

Where to find it:
Downtown, the heart of major metros

What you can call home:
Aging single family homes and apartments, modern luxury lofts and condos converted from old warehouses and multi-use developments

Your Neighbors:
Ethnically diverse mix of young single professionals, low to middle income families and seniors

Why You’ll Like It:
Affordable housing, eclectic mix of high-end and modest, close to nightlife and city attractions

Why You May Not:
Little to no public parking, typically has higher rate of crime, transients

2. Urban Pioneer (Up-and-Coming) – Modest, affordable older homes are the hallmark of urban pioneer neighborhoods.

Where to find it:
Near downtown and inner-ring suburbs
What you can call home:
Fixer uppers, older single family homes ranging in style from ranch to modern, garden-style apartment buildings

Your Neighbors:
Ethnically diverse mix of young singles and couples, recently divorced and single parents, aging retirees who have lived in the neighborhood for years, immigrants

Why You’ll Like It:
Cheaper homes that are likely to increase in value, working-class sensibility, new development

Why You May Not:
Construction noise and eyesores, neighbors who can’t renovate their homes

3. New Urban – Neo-traditional architectural styles are a staple in new urban neighborhoods.

Where to find it:
Near a business hub other than the city’s main downtown

What you can call home:
New single family homes in retro styles, upscale apartments and condos, lofts above businesses

Your Neighbors:
Educated, affluent-to-middle income couples with no or few children, young single professionals

Why You’ll Like It:
Close to work, shopping and nightlife

Why You May Not:
Too many hipsters, inflated home prices push some buyers out of the market

4. Cul-de-sacs & Kids (Bedroom) – The ‘burbs”, where yards are green and houses look alike.

Where to find it:
Suburbs and new subdivisions

What you can call home:
Large single family homes with manicured lawns and privacy fences, tract homes, newly built homes

Your Neighbors:
Middle-aged soccer moms and dads whose lives revolve around their children

Why You’ll Like It:
Lots of curb appeal, playmates for your children, active neighborhood associations and good schools

Why You May Not:
You’re single or don’t have children, not close to city hotspots, too generic

5. Pedestrian – Built to a human scale, the brownstone/townhomes neighborhoods are pedestrian friendly.

Where to find it:
Small pockets in major metros

What you can call home:
Cozy condos and apartments, lofts above businesses

Your Neighbors:
Hipsters and single professionals

Why You’ll Like It:
You don’t need a car to get what you need

Why You May Not:
Little to no parking, noise, density

6. Historic – The past rules in historic neighborhoods that were once the hub of the city

Where to find it:
Anywhere

What you can call home:
Large, well-preserved, older single family homes known for their architectural styles ranging from Victorian/Queen Anne to Colonial Revival

Your Neighbors:
Style-conscious middle-aged couples, aging adults who grew up in the neighborhood, home-improvement buffs

Why You’ll Like It:
Lots of curb appeal, history and character

Why You May Not:
Stringent home maintenance and style requirements

7. Status/Destination – A McMansion behind a gate: the essence of the status neighborhood.

 

Where to find it:
In the hills or mountains, by water, behind gates, under the trees

What you can call home:
Large, custom-built single family homes and McMansions on the water, in the hills, under the trees, with city views, in gated communities; plush penthouses and lofts in trendy, urban areas

Your Neighbors:
Affluent high-powered executives and wannabes, upper-middle income achievers, celebrities, millionaires

Why You’ll Like It:
Status, exclusivity, privacy, security

Why You May Not:
Keeping up with the Jones is hard work

8. Ethnic – Chinatown in Chicago or San Francisco are both classic examples of an ethnic neighborhood.

Where to find it:
Near downtowns in major metros

What you can call home:
Small apartments, older single family homes

Your Neighbors:
Immigrants from a particular ethnicity, young couples, budget-conscious singles

Why You’ll Like It:
Affordable housing, interesting cuisine and products

Why You May Not:
If you’re not the same ethnicity, you may feel like an outsider

9. Active/Resort – Palm Springs, California, is the epitome of an active resort area.

Where to find it:
Sunbelt and coastal cities, in the desert, by water or in the mountains

What you can call home:
Large single-family homes in newer architectural styles, luxury cabins, upscale condos

Your Neighbors:
Affluent and active middle-aged adults and seniors

Why You’ll Like It:
Outdoor activities to fit your lifestyle, tons of places to get a tan, go fishing or hiking

Why You May Not:
You’re a couch potato

10. Golf – Having dinner watching golfers on the ninth hole

Where to find it:
New subdivision surrounding a golf course

What you can call home:
Upscale single family homes and condos in mostly contemporary styles

Your Neighbors:
Families with young children, retirees, golf fanatics

Why You’ll Like It:
You love golf, tons of amenities

Why You May Not:
You hate golf

11. Retirement – A mobile home community in the Sunbelt where retirees go to look for better days

Where to find it:
Sunbelt and coastal cities

What you can call home:
Small, low-maintenance apartments and condos with all kinds of amenities

Your Neighbors:
Empty nesters, single seniors

Why You’ll Like It:
Weather, organized activities and social events

Why You May Not:
You’re young and single

12. Rural – If wide open spaces and no next-door neighbors are your bag, head to a rural place

Where to find it:
Miles from the city

What you can call home:
Custom-built homes with lots of acreage and room to grow

Your Neighbors:
Nature

Why You’ll Like It:
Space and privacy

Why You May Not:
Far from everything

Now that you know the different types of neighborhoods, call Norma and let her help you find the real estate lifestyle that is best for you.